Taxpayers—our employers—deserve the most productive employees possible. And county employees who go the extra mile deserve extra recognition.

Recognizing Excellent Employee Performance

Challenges to our county’s system of merit-based pay inevitably appear during each budget cycle.
The fact is, government employees are so used to automatic pay raises that, even thirteen years after the merit-based system was instituted, threats to it still exist.
The Commissioners Court instituted pay-for-performance (PFP) in 2004, before I took office. It has been around for thirteen years now, although it took several years to rollout to the various departments.
In a nutshell, productive employees get a larger salary increase; less productive employees get a smaller salary increase, if any at all. That is the way most of life works—extra effort receives extra recognition and reward.
The question on compensation is always two-fold:
  1. What will the salary increase be, translated into a percentage increase?
  2. What mechanism will be used to distribute the salary increase on a merit basis?
The Commissioners Court digests a great deal of market data to reach the annual percentage salary increase. And, for the last four years, we have addressed the issue of wage compression (where junior employees make close to what more senior employees make). I am confident that we do a good job comparing our salaries against our competition.
As we go into my eleventh budget cycle, challenges to Collin County’s merit-based salary structure continue, but I will continue to defend our merit-based salary system in Collin County.
Taxpayers—our employers—deserve the most productive employees possible. And county employees who go the extra mile deserve extra recognition.